Hand surgery

Hand trauma

Hand trauma surgery is a specialized surgical procedure performed to treat injuries and trauma to the hand, wrist, and forearm. Hand trauma can result from a variety of causes, such as accidents, sports injuries, or work-related workplace injuries.. 

Hand trauma surgery is performed by a trained and experienced hand surgeon, who is specialized in treating hand injuries and conditions. The goal of the surgery is to restore the function, strength, and appearance of the hand and wrist by repairing damaged tissues, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. 

There are several different types of hand trauma surgery, depending on the type and severity of the injury. Some of the most common procedures include: 

  1. Fracture repair: If a bone is broken, the surgeon may use pins, screws, or plates to hold the bone in place while it heals. 
  2. Tendon repair: If a tendon is cut or torn, the surgeon may reattach it to the bone or use a graft to replace the damaged tissue. 
  3. Nerve repair: If a nerve is cut or damaged, the surgeon may repair or replace it to restore feeling and movement to the hand. 
  4. Soft tissue repair: If the skin or other soft tissues are damaged, the surgeon may use a variety of techniques, such as skin grafts or flaps, to repair the area. 
  5. Joint reconstruction: If a joint is damaged, the surgeon may use a variety of techniques, such as joint replacement or fusion, to restore function and mobility. 

Hand trauma surgery is typically performed under local or general anesthesia, depending on the complexity of the procedure. Recovery time can vary depending on the extent of the injury and the type of surgery performed. Patients may require physical therapy or occupational therapy to regain strength and function in the hand index finger and wrist after surgery. 

Carpal tunnel surgery

Carpal tunnel surgery is a procedure performed to treat carpal tunnel syndrome, a condition that occurs when the median nerve is compressed as it passes through the wrist at the carpal tunnel. This can cause pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand, finger and wrist. 

During carpal tunnel surgery, the surgeon makes a small incision in the palm of the hand to access the carpal tunnel. The surgeon then cuts the ligament that forms the roof of the palm side of carpal tunnel to release pressure on the median nerve. This allows the nerve to function properly and relieves the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. 

Carpal tunnel surgery can be performed using different techniques, including open release surgery and endoscopic surgery. In open release surgery, the surgeon makes a larger incision in the palm of wrist handto access the carpal tunnel. In endoscopic surgery, the surgeon makes a smaller incision and uses a small camera to guide the procedure. 

Carpal tunnel surgery is typically performed under local anesthesia and takes less than an hour to complete. Patients can usually go home the same day and resume normal activities within a few weeks. However, full recovery may take several months, and patients may require physical therapy to regain strength and function in the hand and wrist. 

Carpal tunnel surgery is generally considered safe and effective, with a high success rate in relieving the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. However, as with any surgery, there are risks associated with the procedure, such as infection, bleeding, and nerve damage. Patients should discuss the risks and benefits of carpal tunnel surgery with their surgeon to determine whether it is the right option for them. 

Dupuytren’s fasciectomy surgery

Dupuytren’s fasciectomy is a surgical procedure performed to treat Dupuytren’s contracture, a condition that causes thickening and tightening of the connective tissues in the hand, resulting in the bending of the fingers and the inability to fully straighten them. 

During Dupuytren’s fasciectomy surgery, the surgeon makes an incision in the palm of the hand to access the thickened tissue. The surgeon then removes the thickened tissue, along with any nodules, ligaments or cords that are causing the fingers to contract. In some cases, skin grafts or other procedures may be necessary to replace the tissue that is removed. 

Dupuytren’s fasciectomy surgery is typically performed under local or general anesthesia and takes several hours to complete, depending on the extent of the contracture. Patients may need to stay in the hospital overnight, but can usually go home the next day. 

After the surgery, patients will need to wear a splint or cast to immobilize the hand and the thumb sidewrist while they heal. They may also need to undergo physical therapy to regain strength and function in the hand and fingers. 

Dupuytren’s fasciectomy surgery is generally considered safe and effective, with a high success rate in relieving the symptoms of Dupuytren’s contracture. However, as with any surgery, there are risks associated with the procedure, such as infection, bleeding, nerve damage, and recurrence of the contracture. Patients should discuss the risks and benefits of Dupuytren’s fasciectomy surgery with their surgeon to determine whether it is the right option for them. 

Ganglion Surgery

Ganglion surgery is a surgical procedure performed to remove a ganglion cyst, a non-cancerous lump or bump that usually develops on the wrist, elbow or hand. These cysts can cause pain, discomfort, and limited movement of the affected area. 

During ganglion surgery, the surgeon makes a small incision near the cyst and removes it along with any attached stalk or tendon. In some cases, the surgeon may also need to remove a portion of the joint capsule or surrounding tissues to prevent the cyst from recurring. 

Ganglion surgery is typically performed under local anesthesia and takes less than an hour to complete. Patients can usually go home the same day and resume normal activities within a few days. However, full recovery may take several weeks, and patients may need to wear a splint or cast to immobilize the affected area while it heals. 

Ganglion surgery is generally considered safe and effective, with a high success rate in removing the cyst and relieving the associated symptoms. However, as with any surgery, there are risks associated with the procedure, such as infection, bleeding, and nerve damage. Patients should discuss the risks and benefits of ganglion surgery with their surgeon to determine whether it is the right option for them. 

Congenital hand surgery

Congenital hand anomaly surgery is a surgical procedure to correct hand deformities that are present at birth. Congenital hand anomalies can range from mild to severe and can affect the structure and function of the hand. Surgery is usually recommended for more severe anomalies that affect the child’s ability to use their hand or for cosmetic reasons. 

Some common types of congenital hand anomalies that may require surgery include: 

  1. Syndactyly: This is a condition where two or more fingers are fused together. Surgery involves separating the fused fingers and reconstructing the soft tissues and bones. 
  2. Polydactyly: This is a condition where a child is born with extra fingers or toes. Surgery involves removing the extra digit and reconstructing the surrounding soft tissues. 
  3. Radial club hand: This is a condition where the radius bone in the forearm is missing or underdeveloped, leading to a shortened, curved forearm and hand. Surgery involves reconstructing the forearm bones and correcting the hand deformity. 
  4. Thumb hypoplasia: This is a condition where the thumb is underdeveloped or absent. Surgery involves reconstructing the thumb and surrounding soft tissues. 
  5. Ulnar club hand: This is a condition where the ulna bone in the forearm is missing or underdeveloped, leading to a deformity of the hand and wrist. Surgery involves reconstructing the forearm bones and correcting the hand deformity. 

Congenital hand anomaly surgery is typically performed under general anesthesia and may involve a team of specialists, including plastic surgeons, orthopedic surgeons, and hand therapists. The specifics of the procedure will depend on the type and severity of the human handanomaly, and recovery time will vary depending on the complexity of the surgery and the child’s age and overall health. 

It is important for parents to discuss the risks and benefits of surgery with a qualified hand surgeon and to have a full understanding of the potential outcomes and recovery process. 

Tendon surgery

Tendon surgery is a type of surgical procedure that is performed to repair or reconstruct damaged tendons. Tendons are tough, fibrous bands of tissue that connect muscles to bones and allow movement of joints. Tendon injuries can occur due to trauma, overuse, or degenerative conditions, and can lead to pain, weakness, and limited mobility. 

Common types of tendon surgeries include: 

  1. Tendon repair: This procedure is used to repair a torn or ruptured tendon. The damaged ends of the tendon are sutured together, and a splint or cast may be applied to immobilize the joint and allow the tendon to heal. 
  2. Tendon transfer: This procedure involves transferring a healthy tendon from another part of the body to replace a damaged or missing tendon. The transferred tendon is usually re-routed through a bone tunnel and attached to the bone on the other side of the joint. 
  3. Tendon lengthening: This procedure is used to lengthen a tendon that has become shortened due to injury or contracture. The tendon is cut and lengthened, and the joint is immobilized for a period of time to allow the tendon to heal. 
  4. Tendon reconstruction: This procedure is used to reconstruct a damaged or missing tendon using a graft or synthetic material. The graft is typically harvested from another part of the body, such as the hamstring or Achilles tendon. 

Tendon surgery is typically performed under local or general anesthesia, and recovery time will vary depending on the type and severity of the injury and the specific procedure performed. Rehabilitation and physical therapy are often necessary to restore full function and mobility to the affected joint. It is important for patients to follow the post-operative instructions provided by their surgeon and to attend all follow-up appointments to monitor the healing process.